Straddling The Line with Great Effect Again: BlacKkKlansman

With respect to general audiences, Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing, Clockers, Inside Man) has made a career being provocative, not crossing over the line, and not selling out.  Lee is a vocal and animated teller of american stories about people usually mired in the system (e.g., race, gender, education, occupation, location) who are about to challenge the status quo.

Materially more often than not, Lee is exceptionally effective at presenting the story on all fronts; script, production values, music, cinematography and acting.  BlacKkKlansman starring John David Washington in his first real lead role and Adam Driver (This Where I Leave You, Logan Lucky, Star Wars, Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi)  is no exception.

As quirky as the story-line may sound – Two Police Detectives (a Black Man and a Jewish Man) are able to team up and infiltrate the KkK in Colorado and National Headquarters.  Quirky?  Yes.  Truly happened?  Yes, at least in Hollywood terms adapted from a biography.

Lee’s frequent collaborator Terrance Blanchard has created a really solid music track to support the film. Charyse Irvin in what appears to be his first feature length film as Director of Photographer presents a compelling image.

Lee, as much as he wants you to believe he is operating totally in the moment, is a polished professional filmmaker who is operating per plan.  As an audience, we benefit.

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